I know that to those of you who live in Canada, the US, and elsewhere that the noise that we are making on this small island about the current spell of wintery weather might seem a bit . . . histrionic.

But this much snow is unusual for here.

For those who were thinking of coming along, my TEDX talk in Edinburgh has been postponed until next Saturday, March 10th – frankly I’m glad about this – Tom and our neighbours have been digging a route out of the steading which a 4×4 might potentially negotiate, but our local roads have not been ploughed yet, and the drifts along them are several feet deep in places. We can’t get anywhere by vehicle, so, for the time being, are pretty much stuck.

We have not been able to travel to the warehouse to process any orders; and a couple of our expected yarn deliveries have also been held up by the weather. So, if you’ve ordered anything from the shop, be aware that there will be a (hopefully short) delay in shipping out your order, and if you are a knitter waiting for out-of-stock shades of Milarrochy Tweed, these are likely to be available next week, and not this.

But apart from not being able to drive we are absolutely fine: we have a stove, a freezer full of food, and clothes that suit the weather.

I’m topping up the bird feeders

And enjoying the strange, heavy quiet of the blanketed world.

Tom has been taking some wonderful photos . . .

. . . and going to some strange lengths for the perfect snowy shot

In fact, we are all rather enjoying being holed up

and one of us, at least, will never tire of this weather.

If you are in an area affected by the weather, stay warm, and be safe!

love Kate

xx

78 thoughts on “weather

  1. We had over a foot of snow where I live (Kirkintilloch). Luckily me and the husband could work from home as we couldn’t travel in to work so we treated it like a bit of a holiday.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Isn’t it fun how much dogs love the snow?!
    I’ve been doing a bunch of dog- and house sitting gigs recently in the US North-East. One lovely doggie wasn’t much for playing with any kind of toys…but, Boy!, throw him a snowball and look at him go!

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  3. Here in beautiful Sidney, north of Victoria on Vancouver Island, the sky is blue, the sun is out, the cherry trees are budding, the walkers/hikers are out in their numbers and the birds are happy. However, the sun sets at about 5:30 leaving lots of time for knitting by the fire in the evening.

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  4. So I was snowed in down in South Somerset and got a desperate text from my knitting friend, not worried about being stranded 20 miles away but frantic because she did not have the right size needles for her next project for which she had wool; just imagine being snowed in but with no knitting! She was intending to borrow “Buachaille” from me so she could start Striped Baffies to use up left-over wool so I was able to Whatsapp the pattern over to her so crisis averted. Lessons learned: always have a stash of wool and needles and thank goodness for modern technology… thank you Kate for your lovely patterns and words, i enjoy them so much and hope the thaw starts for you soon.

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  5. Down here in Dorset we had as much snow as you, maybe more! Then it sleeted at night, and it made a thick, treacherous coating of ice on top (and pebble iced all my windows, I couldn’t see out for 24 hours!).
    But my dog didn’t like it at all – I have a dachshund! She disappeared completely.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi Kate
    Please can you tell me about the patterns used for the snood, hat, gloves and wristbands you are wearing. I think the snood is the epistrophy pattern and might be ready made kits as shown in your shop but in different colours. Can I buy patterns for these irtems? Many thanks

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  7. I just lived this post! Tom’s pictures are fantastic and definitely share the joy and pleasure in an unusual and unique trait from Mother Nature! Joy, Joy, Joy! Karen

    Sent from my iPad

    >

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  8. I love, weather, snow, and winter! I would be out on my cross-country touring skis every moment I could get—true bliss! Nothing is better to be forced to slow down, enjoy your time together, get outside and see the beauty that abounds thanks to Mother Nature.

    All the shepherds and shepherdess I follow on Twitter in your part of the world I really do feel for them as the workload is even more demanding.

    All this snow is great for the water table, plants, and animals over time. As I say you can not change it so you might as well enjoy it!

    Love the photos great job capturing the light and blowing snow–Tom!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Hi Kate,
    Yes, tucked in warm and safe, quite close by in Rutherglen, Glasgow. Just learned how to lucet using fingers and yarn; what wonders await when we’re ❄️ in and slow down!
    Enjoy and appreciate the website work. Clare x

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  10. I live in Northwestern Ontario, Canada and there’s nothing I love more than a good dump of snow! Makes you slow down, play like a kid again AND feel truly inspired to knit something warm and cozy. Enjoy the reprieve from busyness Kate!
    It will melt before you know it and the demands of your busy life will replace it all too soon!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Oh, the heavy quiet. That’s the best part of a big snow if you ask me. So soothing. So peaceful. Thanks for the lovely pictures, particularly of Bruce!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. It looks wonderful. I’m three months into one of the hottest, stickiest, muggiest New Zealand summers on record, and it’s like living in dog breath or the outlet of a clothes dryer. All that cold and crispness may have made me whimper a little.

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  13. Fantastic photos, especially the one of you with Bruce leaping up. Even though we are used to lots and lots of snow here on the north shore of Lake Ontario, we spent quite a few years in Washington, DC where even a few flakes of snow could cause mass hysteria, and with good reason, given the lack of resources and now-how to deal with it. When we moved back to Canada my daughter thought she would have “snow days” off school. She was so disappointed to discover that her new school NEVER closed for mere snow.
    P.S. Even though we actually have less snow than you right now, Lake Ontario, at the bottom of my street, is still frozen over. That’s normal for early March in this slice of the globe.

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  14. I just love these stunning photos. I have yet to spend some extended time in the snow. Currently it will be 26 C today and sunny in Adelaide, South Australia. We whinge about our heat as well! At least in the snow and cold, it’s lovely to snuggle up to a warm open fire and either read or knit/crochet.

    Bruce you should have your snow boots on!

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  15. We had a brief sniff of spring and then more snow last night (although not enough to keep us in) and our black standard poodle of 14 years is in heaven. What is it about dogs and snowballs!?!

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      1. I’m in Exeter, ON 😄 Funny how many Canadians 💕 This blog!

        We would never make fun of anyone’s snow pains..we totally understand, and you DO have a crazy amount of the white stuff! It looks like Europe has gotten our Canadian Winter and we got theirs.

        Stay warm and safe…and most of all, enjoy the peace a good snow storm can bring. The photos are absolutely beautiful

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  16. “Mon pays, ce n’est pas un pays, c’est l’hiver”…is one of my favourite chansons by Gilles Vigneault, from Quebec, Canada where they really know how to celebrate winter. I enjoyed your post showing how you, Tom and The Bruce are celebrating your winter weather. We have had a bit of rare snow in Vancouver BC this winter- it does enhance the knitting. We are coming to Scotland in May and are glad we will not be seeing snow.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I’ve been a New Englander my whole life (minus a year in actual England), so it does make me giggle a bit. We don’t call it bad weather here, just “winter”! It’s fun to see everyone’s photos, though, since you do rarely see the UK covered with snow. (I really enjoyed the pics from Vatican City as well!)

    A “French Toast Warning System” is a popular joke around here. Basically, you base the severity of the storm on whether you need to stock up on bread, milk, and eggs asap. The shelves often get cleared out before a blizzard or Nor’easter, even though people usually end up eating other things. It’s a bit strange.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. A wee bit of snow? I like that you have the’ Love it or Lump it ‘ attitude. Its here, its cold and may as well have fun in it.
    Have you ever tried cross country (Nordic) skiing? Some of these hills would make a downhill tuck exciting. hahah

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  19. We’ve had a ton of snow in NH this yr too, but of course we’re used to it. It’s fun to see Bruce enjoying himself. Our black lab Jane LOVES the snow. Beautiful photographs (as always). Hope you are able to get out soon.

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    1. Haha, where in California? I’m in the Sierra, just north of Yosemite and we have plenty of snow! Lots of great knitting time!

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  20. So good to see dear Bruce having a grand time, as always! What a lovely blanket of snow you have. We had a lot of snow over the weekend and on Sunday morning, my husband and I went snowshoeing. It was glorious! Bruce’s excitement looks the same as I felt upon seeing all the snow. Stay cozy!

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  21. One’s approach to the weather is really dependent upon their experience, so I think you’re right to be awed/overwhelmed/freaked out or any response you might have. You got a lot of snow! And I live in Canada. I’m actually jealous because ours have been a little bit of this and a little bit of that, but mostly gross banks of blackish snow along the roads. We got a bit last night, but it’ll be melted in an hour or two today. Enjoy!

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  22. We have had very little snow compared to some places, but are being battered by high winds, so still have a need to be wearing all the wool we own! It has made us both wonder how non-knitters stay warm in this weather!

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  23. Glad to see you enjoying the snow. We’ve had a very mild winter in Wisconsin, never more then 5″ at a time. But, you never know what March will bring!

    That snow looks great for snowshoing!

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  24. Good morning Kate, Tom, and Bruce. I live in Syracuse, New York, USA. We typically have over 100 inches of snow per year. We had a warm spell two weeks ago and thought we were through with winter, but awoke this morning to a storm that is to drop about 10 inches. It is so beautiful. I’m glad you are getting to enjoy what is common place, yet always magical to me, to upstate New York. Have a blast.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Lovely photographs of your snowfall. All of my dogs just love the snow! They become so joyous!
    Today, We here on the Massachusetts coast are getting battered with strong winds and rain with flood tides due to the full moon. I guess the worst is yet to come for the immediate coast with winds up to hurricane force due later today.May change to some snow later.
    Lots of knitting and reading will be taking place today and tonite.

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  26. Gorgeous photos. I’m a northern lass living in Sussex where half an inch of snow brings panic buyers out in force! Great knitting weather though….

    Liked by 2 people

  27. I used to live on the coast of British Columbia. Winters were mostly rainy. I remember as a child if we did get a huge snowfall it was chaos. We didn’t have the equipment to cope. The last few winters they have been getting major amounts of snow. I live in Ontario now and this morning I woke up to see 20 cm of snow on the ground. The last 2 weeks all the snow we had was gone. It looks so beautiful. I love the photos.

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  28. I’ve just recently started reading your blog and I can’t tell you how much I enjoy it! Of course I love the knitting posts and your lovely knitwork, but much like my other knitter blogger, yarnharlot, I like to hear what else you have to show and talk about. I live in Indiana in the US and can’t wait to see Scotland in April. Your pictures and talk of daily life just makes me more excited about it. And I just can’t say enough about Tom’s photographs. I know the scenery is gorgeous to begin with but he really captures it for me. It was interesting to hear what lengths you both went to to photograph your knitwear on the lounge the other day. It’s such a good reminder of the work you both put into these blog posts.
    You’re both such wonderful artists and I appreciate your sharing your work with us.
    And any blog that starts off with that great snowy, doggy face has me smiling big time!
    PS That’s A LOT of snow for a place that rarely gets any. Please make sure it’s gone by the time I arrive April 9th. Thank you!

    Liked by 3 people

  29. I am in Canada and can’t quite believe what the UK is going through this week. From what I see, I’m not sure that we would cope as well with the volume of snow and fierceness of this storm. I am in awe of the farmers who are in the midst of lambing, with frozen water and unplowed roads, still able to feed and look after their flocks. And their cattle.
    Tom’s photos of snow are quite lovely and Bruce looks like he’s having a ball.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Realmente es un placer leerte y ver que tu salud esta mejor, las fotos estan preciosas, gracias por hacernos parte de tu vida, un abrazo fraterno desde la Patagonia Chilena
    Valeska.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. love the photos, dogs just do not seem to feel the cold like us mere humans!
    We have had no where near as much snow in Cambridgeshire but my dog is so excited about the snow and is overly inquisitive about the whole experience, it is such a joy to see. Keep warm everyone.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Love your photos, lovely to see Bruce having such a good time in the snow. Don’t think about orders etc., untill the snow is gone and you can get to there safely. I’m at home today, roads where terrible this morning and I live an a big city,, so important to stay warm and safe.

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  33. Northern people know best how unexpected snow can be dangerous as well as fun and pretty. We check on neighbours, share in shovelling and plowing then enjoy the fun winter brings. You certainly have the fun down pat.
    Canadians still roll their eyes when we see the quote from Voltaire that Canada is just “a few acres of snow”. With deadpan faces we like to tell our neighbours to the south how we use dogsleds to get around, etc. We can still get some believers from the Deep South.
    I had my eye on a photo of Tom’s that had snow falling but maybe I will wait a bit and see if he post any new ones from this snowfall. Stay safe and warm. Watch for the rise of water levels when it all melts!

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  34. What a wonderful post! Love the photos and love the idea of being holed up with a stove and good company.

    We are not holed up but, as you say, with the right clothes for the weather (lots of wool layers), we are really enjoying it. It’s a gorgeous dry cold, quite unlike our usual. I think this afternoon will be perfect for family knitting projects, sadly with no gorgeous doggie.

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  35. Tom moves like Strider, Bruce like an Elf… I am in the minority (even here in Canada) because I live for winter. Winter is a sobering experience and demands your attention. The cold and snow clears the mind, steadies the spirit, calms the soul. Plus, you get to knit a lot of goodness. Enjoy the season, Kate and Tom and Bruce, and thank you for your wonderful posts. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

  36. I’m old enough to remember very well the 1962/63 winter. The snow started on Boxing Day and didn’t go away until the end of March. We lived in the Warwickshire countryside and weren’t on mains water. The pipes from the field into the house froze and we had no running water for 6 weeks. No central heating either. Ah, we were tough then!!

    Liked by 1 person

  37. It’s been an incredibly strange winter everywhere. I grew up in South Dakota so i know about lots of snow. It will melt and then y’all will have mud. But the earth cries for moisture. Stay safe.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. Have a lovely time in all that snow. Photos are great and keep them coming. Janet Wray in Nevada, Mo. USA where the daytime temp is 60 degrees F. today. Cold spell next week, tho. >

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  39. I love Tom’s photos and Bruce is clearly nuts. For me its great news that your talk has been postponed as I can now come. Just bought my ticket and really looking forward to it.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Lovely photos, I’m Scottish and miss the real snow! Living in the south of England we’ve only had a light dusting, but enough to send my dogs nuts! Stay safe! It won’t last forever!

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  41. Bruce can fly!
    He must be loving it, but at the same time confused as the balls you throw keep disappearing. I love his checking on Tom often as he was walking as it to say ‘Dude, this is getting a bit more of a leap than a walk. You still good?’

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  42. Love Tom’s photos -we’ve only got a sprinkling here by the coast in North Wales, still exciting for us as we hardly experience snow – although I’m from Snowdonia originally where we do get proper snow. Real knitting and staying cozy weather. Stay safe and warm
    Rhian

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, we too are in North Wales and our landscape was much like Kate’s, fantastic sculptural drifts, endless snowfall and only main road gritted. A week of that, sitting by he woodburner and knitting was the exact right amount of time my body needed to recuperate from flu. Nature in all her munificence.

      Thank you Tom and Kate, and Bruce, and Mel. You’ve kept us going through the winter!

      Liked by 1 person

  43. Funnily enough, the Canadians I know (including my brother) are the ones who have been pointing out that of course we’re finding this weather difficult, and of course we don’t have the resources to manage it- because it’s incredibly rare! Only 2 inches in SE Cornwall, but even the old boys I’ve met in the shop can’t remember the last time we got this level of snow in the village. Not snowed in, but still a good excuse for wearing wool, keeping the wood stove going, and making hot chocolate mid-morning.

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