We have just sent the Inspired by Islay book to the printers! All is very well here, apart from the fact that I currently find myself with nothing to knit. I had been saving the pleasure of the Wild Apple Bohus kit that I purchased in Sweden a few years ago for this very moment, but have been (horrors) completely unable to locate it.

westonpomegranite2-copy

The failure of the Wild Apple to turn up is all the weirder because there really aren’t that many places around here for it to hide. Perhaps surprisingly for someone who loves yarn and works with it every day, I have virtually no stash. I suppose you may find this odd, but apart from always having a plain sock or two on the go, I really only tend to knit what I’m actually designing. In the past few years, this has largely meant working with my own yarn, or sometimes yarn produced by a couple of other companies, such as Jamieson & Smith. Very occasionally I will treat myself to a kit – such as Carol Sunday’s Milano or Kirsten Olsson’s Gotiska Fönstret – for those pleasant moments (such as right now) when I’ve completed a big project and there’s nothing urgent to design.

westonpomegranite3-copy

So until the Wild Apple appears (I am holding out hope for the loft, into which only Tom can venture) my fingers really are itching to get knitting . . . and I can’t think of anything I actually want to knit. Can you help me?

westonpepper3

Basically, I would like to buy myself some lovely new yarn and knit something from a pattern written by someone other than myself. In terms of the yarn, I would like to try something new to me and I’m really open to any and all suggestions, though it would be good if the yarn were available somewhere in the UK (I’m starting to feel antsy and need to start knitting something soon-ish). For the pattern, as I’m knitting for myself, I would like to knit a garment, and it would be interesting to try a new-to-me construction or something in a slightly different style. Please leave your suggestions in the comments below! And thankyou in advance.

westonpepper1-copy

The images in this post are the results of Tom’s latest studio experiment, inspired by Edward Weston’s Pepper no.30. I like their slightly abstracted nature and am happy to say that the decaying banana has been abandoned (at least for the time being).

westonpomegranite-copy

188 thoughts on “tell me what to knit

  1. Heidi Kirrmaier has some lovely patterns. Her snowflower sweater has a nice design feature where you knit the yoke bottom up but the body top down so it’s easier to try on as you go. She also has some beautiful jackets.

    Martina Behm always has quick all-knit constructions that are fascinating to work up. I’m very intrigued by the Shrug and More and Sleeves.

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  2. The Wild Apple Bohus has been hibernating in my closet for many years. Perhaps this will inspire me to get it out again. A Wild Apple KAL would be lovely.

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    1. Yes, I also have an wild apple bohus hibernating here.It is such a pleasure to knit with the angora yarn…but it is a long term project and I have lost the mojo.A KAL !

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  3. Joji Locatelli from Argentina is a lovely designer. She takes a lot of trouble with her patterns and focuses on flowing lines and textures. Lots of shawls too. In the depths of a British winter I like knitting something with South American flair.

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  4. Crochet! http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/comet-7
    Tunisian crochet: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/venus-10
    Double knitting: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/fractal-cowl
    Patterns by Olga Buraya-Kefelian, e.g. http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/boko-boko-cowl (so sculptural!) or http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/tatara (just because)
    Finally, stacked stitches, e.g. the very beautiful http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/fox-paws (which has already had shout outs by earlier commenters)
    Yarn suggestions: I love Whistlebare yarns http://www.whistlebare.co.uk
    I’ve not used Uist wool, but I like their story: https://www.uistwool.com

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  5. Hopefully, you’ll find your kit, but I think I live in a house where things slip into alternate dimensions on occasion and usually don’t come back. There is one particular instance where we know this genuinely happened. Quantum physics seem to suggest I’m not just crazy. A friend tells me there’s a room in heaven where all lost things wait for us and I hope to be reunited w/ a hand painted scarf that I miss a lot; and a few earrings, a shawl, etc.
    The local yarn shop carries a lovely yarns w/ yak hair content, which has fascinated me since I first heard of it in a textile science class 40+ yrs. ago. Yak hair is so good an insulator that even small amounts have a significant effect. Back when I first heard about it they were experimenting w/ lace patterns because 100% in straight knitting, it was too warm to wear. The colors of this brand are luscious, the surface has a beautiful sheen, the yarn store proprietor tells me it knits up w/ good definition. I haven’t tried it myself, but maybe you’d like to take the plunge? http://www.ravelry.com/yarns/library/juniper-moon-farm-tenzing

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  6. You have enough suggestions to knit for months, but…

    I assume you like isles. How about trying some Dutch wool from the Island of Texel?
    The island is known for its sheep.
    Not available in the UK but online:
    https://noordkroon.nl/webwinkel/schapenwoltexel/

    (Dutch only, but if needed I would be more than happy to advise you)

    They come in natural colours only and in three weights: aran, light DK and fingering. Plus a traditional marled sock yarn (sans polyamide).

    A knitting pattern: not one by an unknown designer.. I was thinking about Fairchild by Bristol Ivy since it has an interesting construction and one that is not featured in your designs as far as I can see.
    Happy knitting!

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  7. I’ve just bought Ninilchik swoncho by Caitlin Hunter. It’s like a huge yoke made into a poncho with ‘arms’ ! Love the construction of it, and its pattern is a take on an oversized Lopapeysa. Kits are also available too. Follow the link on Ravelry to the farmers daughter fibres for these.

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  8. I look forward to seeing what knitting pattern you select and your interpretation of it. I have the opposite problem as I have a small flock of Shetland sheep, so I have more yarn than time to knit. My husband is also a photographer, so we have an appreciation of and enjoy Tom’s photographs. We have copies of Weston’s Daybooks and my husband’s boss has an original of Pepper No. 30 (printed by Cole Weston) — yes, we are big fans of Weston. I enjoy reading all of your blog posts and all the stories behind your designs and cannot wait for my copy of Inspired by Inslay!!

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  9. Knit a Fair Isle Fishermen’s Kep. Join the FB page and support the museum on Fair Isle by purchasing the pattern written by Anne Sinclair. Join the KAL and knit a traditional one or create your own unique kep. Any colour mix you like, any arrangement of patterns, traditional or not, any length you like, line it if you want, knit a message (or not) in the lining of the brim…………..Your choice!

    You’ll encounter a very friendly knitting community that goes from Alaska to Australia.

    You might even see those of us who will be at EYF on the Friday……with our keps, from all over the place!

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  10. What about Carol Sunday’s Old Town? I made it for my mum, who is small with narrow shoulders, and it suited her well. It has an interesting construction in the upper back and shoulders. A drapey sportweight yarn would work, maybe something with a bit of alpaca?

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  11. Joji Locatelli from Argentina is a lovely designer. Like you she takes a lot of trouble with her patterns. Her elegant designs emphasis flowing lines and textures and she also designs lots of shawls.

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  12. With 160 suggestions how could you possibly need one more? I’m suggesting something from my Ravelry favorites page. Called Roman Glass, it is a waistcoat….. photo-only in one or another of Kaffe’s books. As a lover of ancient history and craft I am drawn to this overly complex but handsome waistcoat. Having been to Vindolanda and perused that compelling museum of objects I believe this waistcoat with its reference to early Roman glass connects at least to the history of The Borders. I can’t attach a photo but you can find it on Ravelry. I’d be intrigued to see your version. Would it be a fun and relaxing diversion? I’d love to hear about it!

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  13. Now that’s an interesting question for your readers-

    I’m knitting the Shoreline Vest by Carrie Bostick Hoge. It’s in the Swoon Maine book. I’ve been wanting a layering piece, not too heavy, and found a lovely undyed wool from a neighboring island, Marrowstone Island. It’s from the two-year fleece from a sheep named Dorris. : )

    The vest uses Carol Sunday’s Sunday Short Rows technique, something new for me. Short rows have always been a bit scary, especially when it comes to reading the wraps for pick up. This is so neat!

    Happy knitting and good luck with your case of start-itis.

    Heather

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  14. I hope you find the wild apple kit because It is just so darn beautiful to knit and the yarn such a luxury. I made the hat and knitted a pair of mittens with the leftovers.

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  15. I literally just read an article by Julia Farwell-Clay titled “The Mind of a Designer: When Mohair Met Intarsia” on the Mason-Dixon knitting blog. It was amazing and I think something you could totally wrap your head around and create something spectacular!

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  16. I can see you’ve had loads of suggestions, but if you want to learn a new technique, have you tried thrums ? I’ve just learn how to “thrum”, if the verb exists, and have made several pairs of socks and mitts. If you’re intrigued, there are several very useful YouTube videos, but a good pattern is “Cadeautje” by Isolda Teague. (Check out Ravelry). Excellent for the next time you come up to Shetland when it’s freezing !

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  17. I like to knit with different weights of yarn. One type of yarn I find very difficult to find a flattering garment pattern for is super bulky yarn. As your designs are always so flattering, I would love to see what type of garment you would choose for a super bulky yarn.

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  18. This yarn has a beautiful lustre because of the silk thread blend.

    Einrúm E+4 (60% wool, 40% pure Thai silk), 50 g ball = approx. 179 m / 196 yds, needles 3-4 mm/US 2,5 – 6
    EINRÚM E is Einband from Ístex (100% Icelandic wool, lace weight) plied together with 4 threads (E+4) of Thai silk.

    http://www.ravelry.com/yarns/library/einrum-e4

    Here is a lovely pattern,
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/jobjorg
    http://www.ravelry.com/projects/hodgun/jobjorg-2

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  19. I haven’t got a suggestion for a pattern, but here are two interesting 4-ply British Breed wool yarns: Home Farm Wensleydale’s Natural Coloured Wensleydale and Doulton Flock’s 4-ply Border Leicester yarn. The first is a rare brown wensleydale which is surprisingly soft and has a lovely halo. The second is a bouncy, smoother 4-ply dyed in a small range of very solid colours.

    http://www.homefarmwensleydales.com/store/rare-breed-coloured-wensleydale-pure-wool-4-ply
    http://www.borderleicester.com/yarn-shop.html

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  20. Anything by Carol Sunday! I swear she thinks in 3-d and her designs are super wearable but fashion forward. Or Elizabeth Dougherty. I test knit Clio and the construction is fascinating. Also very cool!Fittable but modern. You could sub Shilasdair for Carol’s yarn if you can’t wait for a delivery (tho do order some or use your Milano kit).

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  21. A couple of suggestions, that I don’t think have been mentioned.

    I have long believed that Carol Sunday’s “Kelmscott” is the most beautiful cardi, ever. It wouldn’t be quick, but it would certainly be worth the effort.
    http://www.twistcollective.com/2009/winter/magazinepage_040.php

    Jennifer Wood’s “Refined Knits” has a pleasing selection of garments and accessories.
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/sources/refined-knits

    I hope the links work!

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  22. I’m excited about Elizabeth Doherty’s “Clio” sweater that I’m knitting at the moment. Also, if your kit turns up at any moment and you want to start something that you can just put down and then pick up again later without a hitch…the color thrill of “ZickZack” using Mille Colori Baby, can’t be beat!

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  23. I can see you in Bristol Ivy’s Griffin Sweater, which combines cables, cosiness and clever construction in a frankly irresistible package. It calls for a DK so it should be easy to find an exciting and suitable loca wool (or just go for the totally solid, excellent-value New Lanark DK).

    This might be more like work than play, but I would be super interested to see you return to Shetland lace patterns for garments (cf Betty Mouat Sweater). Would love to see your take on either an Old Shell Lace Pattern sweater (e.g. this one from the Traditional Sweater Book (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/old-shell-pattern-lace-sweater) or a spencer.

    And I hope the Bohus kit turns up soon!

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  24. All the shades from South Downs Yarns are truly
    lovely and a headband could be an ideal short project
    Because I bet as soon as you started, the kit you’re
    looking for will turn up!!!

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  25. Kate, I’ll send you one of the scarf patterns for my Summer School class if you are that desperate – and you want to try J&S lace weight. By the time you have finished with it you will be desperate to get back to your own patterns. :)

    Liked by 1 person

  26. There are so many lovely patterns! If you weren’t looking for a garment I would say some Lucy Hague cables or a Stephen West shawl. Just for all the interesting techniques.
    Stephen West’s Enchanted Mesa sweater has an interesting construction. I’ve not tried it! I keep meaning to try something completely top down from Isabel Kraemer or Asa Tricosa. Then there is my old favourite of Kim Hargreaves.
    Bristol Ivy’s new shawl would be fun!
    I think I’ve got too many favourites, quite apart from the Inspired by Islay patterns.

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  27. Michele Wang is a wonderful designer who does classic with a modern twist. She has a new collection for Brooklyn Tweed where some of her designs are chunky weight which would knit up quickly. I have put Hague on my to do list for my daughter in law in Sweden. I live in the southern part of the USA, so very seldom get to wear wool but love to knit with it. You’d have to substitute yarn but you probably won’t have a problem finding options in the U.K.
    I look forward to seeing what you choose.

    Happy Knitting!

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  28. If I was you, I would knit something using Rowan’s ‘Brushed fleece’ yarn – it looks quite out-doorsy but very soft (mind you – i have never knitted with it myself….). Or my second recommendation is Donegal Tweed…… good luck, I am looking forward to knitting with your Buchaille yarn…..

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  29. I have always wanted to make a Cowichan inspired sweater. I think you would enjoy the history behind the knitting and you could use an all Canadian roving yarn such as Briggs and Little Roving, Custom Woolen Mills Prairie Sea Fusion or McAusland’s Pencil roving.

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  30. I am in exactly the same position…. ! I want a fast, chunky knit, from wool and the gang…. but can’t afford it. I’d also like to make a thick knit cushion cover or two for the sofa….
    I adore these photographs – they are quite eerie, which I love. The first pomegranate reminds me of a skull, while the peppers remind me of surrealist paintings of the human form. Absolutely stunning! Your Tom is like you, a very talented and creative person!

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  31. I would be tempted by a Brooklyn Tweed design such as:
    Vika http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/vika-for-adults ,
    Celyn http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/celyn
    Element http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/element-6
    Keaton http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/keaton-5
    Flight (very Bohus) http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/flight-4
    Levenwick http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/levenwick
    Burr http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/burr-2
    Carpino http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/carpino
    (their yarn is available from Loop).

    Or possibly something by Kyle Kunnecke: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/sources/urban-knit-collection-18-city-inspired-knitting-patterns-for-the-modern-wardrobe/patterns. He does really interesting colourwork (see the D’Amour Wrap, for example, in Quince & Co. Finch).

    Good luck finding your project.

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  32. Carol Feller has just released a new pattern called Slateford. I took one look and fell in love. I like the way she works with top down raglan shaping and Slateford has some interesting design details. It is next on my list of sweaters…after finishing Oa and Killybegs. Oh, and I am going to knit one more Hap for Harriet for a friend who saw my first and fell in love with it. We are exchanging the shawl for some hand-made jewelry. Win-win!

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  33. Wow, lots of great suggestions here!

    Personally, if it were me, I’d tear my house apart looking for that Bohus kit (sounds like you already did this). And then I’d light a fire under my beloved’s arse to get into that “hard-to-get-to” space to see if it’s there.
    You wrote with such passion about your previous Bohus project that it seems like a no brainer to me.
    I knit a Bohus Greenwood hat a couple of years ago and it was pure bliss! Such visceral satisfaction.

    BTW, beautiful B&W still life studies (I am a Weston fan as well)…I like the boldness and yet unseen mystery that lies waiting in the dark of the first pomegranate image. Chiaroscuro lighting breathes quite a different and untold story to ordinary day-to-day objects.

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  34. Something mindless to rest your mind from being so busy. A garter stitch project always attracts me when I want something I don’t have to think about.

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  35. Winter Petrichor by Bristol Ivy is an amazing design and construction.
    On yarn, Ginger Twist in Edinburgh has some fabulous British yarns at the moment – Teeswater and Gotland from Chopped Ginger and alpaca Jacob blend from a farm in East Lothian. Also, could I give a shout out for Ystrad Organics – the Wensleydale organic DK yarn is so lustrous and beautiful.

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  36. I highly recommend Sheltered by Andrea Mowry. It could be done in any number of yarns you could obtain locally. It’s deceptively simple, but extremely stylish and it’s perfect for dog walking! She’s the same designer whose currently the darling of Ravelry with “Find Your Fade” (yes, I knit that too and really recommend it! So fun.). Good luck.

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  37. Dear Kate,
    What a lovely predicament to be in. Take a few moments to savour the gift of time to do as you please. What would make you most happy to create? Listen and let your thoughts find your direction. You will find your Bohus Wild Apple kit when you need to. If all else fails Bruce would be up for a walk ( as all labs always are) and lead you to inspiration in the great outdoors.
    Have fun.
    Karen

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  38. Darn, when I saw the title of this post I was hoping I could get you to knit my daughter some baby socks. Why are all commercial baby socks cotton? They do nothing to keep warm the extremities of a small human with poor circulation! I’ve been meaning to knit some myself, but I can’t finish this pair of baby mittens (they’ve only ben on the needles for about three months…)

    As for what you should knit, Carol Feller (Stolen Stitches) has some interestingly constructed designs – I’m particualrly taken with Ravi. And why not sub in something from Blacker Yarns/ Everything they stock seems to be lovely!

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  39. Take a look at this site http://www.geilsk.com/ – she designs wonderful some patterns are scuptural at least thats my opinion. Try not to look or search for the hidden kit – look for another mislayed thing and then the kit will be found.

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  40. Nice of you to ask this creative community for ideas. I echo the nomination of Carol Feller and loved knitting “Santa Rosa Plum” in gardient yarn. The pattern is top down and features bands of lace on the fronts,backs and sleeves. For a shawl,I love the designs of Natalie Servant in her annual Tour de France KAL. My favourite is “Peloton” which I knit in fingering.

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  41. Get away from Great Britain and Europe – something American, Canadian or Japanese, use a Barbara Walker or a Japanese dictionary for a scarf. Use a wonderful NY state yarn – Jill Draper, Into the Whirled, Catskill Merino.

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  42. I quite love Carol Sunday’s Old Town cardi, & if I recall correctly it has an interesting construction.Good luck deciding! So many suggestions!

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  43. So many wonderful suggestions, somebody already mentioned Marion Isager and Hanne Falkenberg I second them but would also like to recommend another Danish designer Helga Isager (Marion’s daughter). Her patterns are simple and elegant yet interestingly constructed with beautiful colours and textures, she also combines yarns in pleasing ways knitting two or three strands together and swapping them out individually or together. Isager yarn is available in the UK or ships really quickly from Denmark http://shop.isagerstrik.dk/ie/home.html.

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  44. I think something that could offer us the opportunity to learn from you about how to make something fit/drape well AND support itself. I have this in my “Epic” list where I keep those things I may never make but wish I could. I think the shape would work well with your skirt styles, also. I do like it in the cardigan version – would make it a year round item in your part of the world…
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/sand-dollar

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  45. Hello Kate, I want to suggest that the slight impasse you find yourself in should be enjoyed by not searching for a pattern and considering that you don’t have any stash (that enviable position to be in, frankly), to go, if possible to actual yarn places and wait for a yarn to speak to you. Or yarns – colour, or feel. Make up some rules. The one that feels the best for this time I will buy. This colour and that colour because I am itching for them in my life right now. Don’t buy with a pattern in mind. Your responses to yarns and colours will tell you what to knit. Walk to those places saying “Iam open to finding what needs to be knitted”.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Wonderful advice!
      (Before reading this, I would have suggested Jennifer Wood’stove “Refined Knits”, which I just purchased with a birthday gift card from a dear son. And, I look forward to purchasing Kate’s “Islay” book when available. )

      Thanks you, Kate, for sharing this lovely dilemma with all of us.

      Sincerely,
      Karen

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  46. Why not knit something by the Danish designer Mariann Isager. She has some Japanese inspired patterns that are just beatiful!

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  47. Hi Kate, have you heard of the book ‘sequence knitting’ by Cecelia Campochiaro? It looks a very interesting book but you could cast on her free pattern for the Abelan scarf from Ravelry immediately. Sequence knitting creates a reversible fabric, something I hadn’t come across before. I know very well that antsy feeling when you don’t have something to knit!

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  48. Something by Olga Buraya-Kefelian she has some interesting constructions and you could take yourself out of your comfort zone and use linen. This is quite stiff so you may want to wash it before knitting, it softens every time you wash it. Lots of yarn companies sell it in the uk, Airedale yarns have just added natural colours to their rang which you may like. Anyway have a good time doing whatever you choose and have a nice break.

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  49. Some amazing suggestions here – some new to me too so I’ll spend a happy hour next week checking them out!
    Options from me…
    1. Coop Knits Socks – Rachel Coopey (you can never have too many hand knit socks)
    2. Marie Wallin – just amazing styles and colours. I’m currently knitting one of Marie’s blankets / throws. Or perhaps consider one of the other home accessories e.g. a cushion? http://www.mariewallin.com/
    3. Hilary Grant – based in Orkney and has just released a new book ‘Knitting From the North’
    4. Gwen Wagner-Adair – very talented lady…lots to choose from @ https://petitchoufleurknits.co.uk/. I particularly like Anisoptera by Petitchoufleur
    5. Elizabeth Lovick has some amazing Shetland Lace patterns and also a number of scarves and cushions knitted in North Ronaldsay yarn – grown in Orkney

    Whatever you decide on enjoy!

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  50. Why don’t you take a few moments to shock!
    horror!……..sew? As a knitter sometimes, I just
    need the rhythm of a different needle. At the mo,
    I am working on a RICO tapestry. Highly
    contemporary piece akin to Bargello work but
    Just working in grey and white. Beautiful out in
    Your homestead in outer Glasgow. You can then
    Mull (‘cuse pun) your knitting options and make
    You even more keen to get finished and get
    started on a new garment……..

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  51. Here’s a third vote for “Hitofude”, i have made three, one in cotton, one in handspun mohair/wool, and one in a toddler’s size in baby yarn (i simply used the smallest size instructions, but on 3 mm needles)….

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  52. An Elizabeth Zimmerman or Meg Swansen classic in a yarn you love. I always turn to their designs when I am looking for something to knit. So many ideas to choose from and many with great design aspects from which one can always learn something new. Tomten jacket, shawl collared vest, Icelandic overblouse, mitered cardigan, pi shawl, a Faroese sweater, an EZ coat, the list goes on and on.

    Liked by 2 people

  53. What about going completely retro and making something from a 1950’s pattern. There’s bound to be equivalent yarns out there and I think it’d be interesting to compare with today’s patterns.

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  54. I too love Alice Starmore’s Tudor Roses book, I just don’t know which one to knit first. I also like Jennifer Wood’ designs and also those of Linda Marveng. Lots of cables and lace in their designs. Also Botanical Knits by Alana Dakos are in my favourites. So many gorgeous patterns out there.

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  55. Love the photos! Well, they’re not garments, but I have always wanted to knit from one of the patterns on knit/lab by Kieran Foley. The colours and patterns are exquisite. I have really enjoyed being part of the Inspired by Islay club and can’t wait for my book. My mum is from Islay and I have visited the places that inspired you, so your whole project has held special meaning for me.

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  56. I have no suggestions for patterns, but do have a look at BarberBlackSheep yarn. It’s in lovely colours, hand dyed and Katherine has had it spun from a very few special fleeces. Never to be repeated.

    Liked by 1 person

  57. I second the votes for anything by Elizabeth Doherty (she is SO smart, and her designs so elegant), Carol Feller (love) and have long admired many of Carol Sunday’s beautiful designs. I am also a huge fan of Anne Hanson’s designs. What about Ysolda too, she is so inventive and many of the yarns that she uses are UK based, like Old Maiden Aunt, etc. I find it overwhelming myself to choose a pattern since there are so many utterly gorgeous designs out there in the Knitterly cyberspace today. But what I really love about your post is reading everyone’s suggestions and adding them to my own queue list!
    So thank you for opening this dialogue!

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  58. I’ve just finished my first ziggarut sweater by Asa Tricosa. It’s Messing About in Boats and is a fascinatingly different way of knitting a top-down and set-in-sleeve sweater. It’s also a quick knit.

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  59. How about Ninilchick Swoncho by
    by @boylandknitworks on Instagram. It comes
    out the 13th. It calls for yarn made in the US,
    but what about using Moel View Yarns (Wales) ?
    It looks gorgeous!

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  60. “For the pattern, as I’m knitting for myself, I would like to knit a garment, and it would be interesting to try a new-to-me construction or something in a slightly different style”
    Have a ramble around the charity shops/second-hand book stalls, for stray patterns or knitting books. It’s surprising what you can come up with. I’ve made some lovely 1940s and 50s styles as well as Aran knits, plus I have the fun of adapting the pattern for modern yarns. You can also get a really good read – “Practical Knitting Illustrated” by Margaret Murray & Jane Koster, for example, is absolutely fascinating for the social history of the immediate post-war times in which it must have been written (it’s undated). I also love to come across another knitter’s hand-written notes in a volume like this! I am loving all your Islay designs, THANK YOU SO MUCH for all your work on them.

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  61. Hi Kate, I have a couple of suggestions for you.
    First is to knit flowers from a book titled, ‘Beautiful Botanical Knits’, by Nora J. Bellows. I have made a few of her flowers and it was a very enjoyable experience, if not a little challenging! Knitting her flowers, made me appreciate the natural beauty and structure of nature. Also you could start designing your own, once you have mastered the basic principles.
    My second suggestion, is from a book entitled,’Tudor Roses’, by Alice Starmore. I haven’t made any of her designs yet, but intend to, very soon. The technical detail in these Tudor inspired designs, looks challenging, but should be easy for an experienced knitter, such as yourself.
    Good luck!

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  62. I think you’ve often knitted relaxing sweaters after big projects – relaxing both to knit and wear! How about something from the Brooklyn Tweed Ganseys book – http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/vanora-2 for example. For a yarn recommendation nearer home, I have discovered some lovely Northumbrian organic wool here http://www.northumbrianorganicwool.co.uk/yarns/ – raised in North Northumberland near Lindisfarne. I’ve used the DK and it knit to 20sts/10cm so it’s quite a heavy dk and could be used for a worsted pattern. It is lovely stuff – I will use it again!

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  63. Dear Kate!

    I am a fan of yours and regularly visit your website. I have a vision in my mind which I think you could beautifully construct and design. A cardigan or jacket knit with rather bulky yarn (needles 5 or 6) with diamond motifs, one base color, like either white/off white or dark and a contrast color or even a few. I have already sketched it up and played around with the idea in my creative mind and believe you could make a beautiful design of such a thing. Diamond motifs in fairisle knitting, a stylish 2 color version and a playful multicolor version, wouldn´t that be something?

    Love
    Kristín S.
    Iceland

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  64. Would agree with anything from Tincanknits and Carol Feller, I have knitted her Akoya cardigan in Titus from baaramewe and it is a favourite of mine.

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  65. Apologies if someone else has already mentioned this, but how about something with contiguous sleeve construction. I am slowly working on Ankestrick’s Walnuss Cardigan with Rowan Felted Tweed.
    The garment is worked seamlessly from the top-down using the contiguous sleeve method developed by Susie Myers, SusieM on Ravelry (http://www.ravelry.com/people/SusieM).

    Liked by 1 person

  66. Try one of Elizabeth Doherty’s sweaters. She comes to design with a background in garment construction, and her sweaters are beautiful and intriguing to knit. Take a look on Ravelry & dive in.

    — Suzanne Wilsey

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  67. how about the newish Elsa Cowl from Cecily Glowik MacDonald? simple, cozy, and fast. by the time you’re finished, you’ll have found your bohus book.

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  68. why not a doll? like theodora from helene magnusson? you sure must have a stash of leftovers.
    have you ever knitted a top-down-yoke? is that different enough for you?

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  69. Wow, I’m going to spend all afternoon looking at all the suggestions above! Not really a pattern or garment suggestion, but I have just received “Sequence Knitting” by Cecelia Campochiaro from Loop. Copies are few and far between, I have been waiting a while for mine, and fiendishly expensive… it’s a big heavy book, but absolutely fascinating. I got the idea from Tom of Holland.

    Liked by 1 person

  70. How about knitting up a toy? I recently discovered this little Shetland pony (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/shetland-pony) after buying one of her other toy patterns (the dachshund), but I got to thinking of the dancing Shetland pony on the Shetland tv commercial & thought that one could easily decorate the pony’s body with Fair Isle to make it look like he was wearing a Fair Isle jumper, just like in the commercial. Good luck with choosing a project. We seem to have lots of ideas for you & the choice will be hard, but maybe one of the choices will trigger another idea in the end.

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  71. Agreed with tincanknits and a bunch of other recommendations above, including Xandy Peters (foxpaws), but I don’t see Norah Gaughan’s designs mentioned yet, and they’re always intriguing. There are MANY, so pick your weight of yarn first and then see what appeals. I’m currently working her flared pullover from her cable sourcebook in Blacker’s special Border Leicester. http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/sourcebook-flared-pullover
    Just browsing through her patterns is inspiring. I just got stuck on this Marbore, conceptually:
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/marbore
    For a quick cardigan that’s a fascinating construction, there’s Lucy Neatby’s Venus Rising. It’s written for tripled sportweight but I did it in doubled worsted-weight.
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/venus-rising-680
    Mine is here: http://www.ravelry.com/projects/DebR/venus-rising-680
    Lucy’s got a lot of other fascinating options.
    For fill-in projects–because sometimes I don’t want to get too deeply into a major project while waiting for yarn that I know I have to turn up–check out Hunter Hammersen’s designs. There are a lot of accessories, and I’m especially fond of her fingerless mitts. They’re not so obviously interesting construction as elegantly understated extremely knowledgeable combinations of techniques.
    Zostera marina is one example: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/zostera-marina-mitt
    Ameliorate is another:http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/ameliorate (I made mine much longer)

    For yarns: J&S, of course; Old Maiden Aunt; Ripplescrafts in Assynt; Blacker (St Kilda lace! or Border Leicester from Doulton Farm, if there’s any left; or the Gotland, dyed or undyed–plus many other options); Elizabeth’s Shetland Handspun or Hilltop Cloud if you’d like handspun yarn. Lots of others!

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  72. I stumbled on the Woodfords cardigan by Elizabeth Doherty the other day, and keep coming back to it in my head. It’s described as “a delicious puzzle in seamless construction, sure to appeal to knitters who love inventive shapes and new approaches,” so it might fit what you’re after. Good luck finding your kit!

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  73. I love the look of Carol Feller’s Landscape Waves. I’ve knit 3 of her sweaters in KALs so I can vouch for her patterns. She knit it using yarn from Blue Moon Fiber Arts(Tina Newton) and I have belonged to Tina’s sock club for 8 years. Like you, Tina champions one American yarn – Targhee. However, she has many other yarns in different fiber blends.
    I first saw the Wild Apples kit when Stephanie Pearl-McPhee blogged about it. It made my heart skip beats, but I knew it was beyond my skill level. If I knew there was one in the house, I don’t think I could go to bed until I’d found it.

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  74. I have just knitted my daughter a skirt, Angel Falls, Garnstudio’s DROPS design 156-8. Any DK yarn would work. It looks stunning on her. I’m about to knit one for my daughter-in-law and will modify it slightly by working the ribbing inside out so as to have more knitting and less purling, then flipping it back for the stocking stitch section. It is not a challenging pattern, however, so you might want to watch some good movies at the same time. CarolGilham

    Liked by 1 person

  75. Your blog, pattern, and photos are inspirational. Nancy Bush’s Miralda Triangular Shawl from Knitted Lace of Estonia is a wonderful knit using interesting lace stitches. Another beautiful shawl is Picadilly by Justyne Lorkowska.

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  76. Right now I’m knitting the Man Cold Vest (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/man-cold-vest) for my dad; but the pattern is written in a lot of sizes, with waist shaping if you want to make it more feminine. It’s a design I would wear myself, actually.
    I don’t know if you’ve ever tried the contiguous top-down method, but it’s pretty interesting. It has twisted stitch cables down the front and back centers. So that would be something you’re not familiar with, and something you are. A nice mix :)

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  77. Dear Kate, I love your patterns and I am a huge fan of your new designs from Inspired by Islay. There is one thing I can’t find in the patterns on ravelry and in books, a nice poncho. So will you make a pattern of a real Kate-poncho? I will certainly knit it!

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    1. Kate, I’m in total agreement with the wish for a poncho. A pull over the head, fair isle yoke, not too long but certainly not too short….it needs too cover the lumps & bumps of an aging figure. My personal wish is for small arm holes that would be much lower, allowing for a cuff & little bit of forearm sleeve (maybe they should be called hand holes). im already dreaming of this being my go-to wrap😉

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  78. I would suggest anything by Anne Hanson and use her Bare Naked yarns. They patterns are beautifully written, fun and satisfyingly challenging to knit and the yarns are wonderful!

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  79. What a fab situation to be in!!! I really love your design but find Bohus knitting very beautiful as well so…until you find it why not take a look at Christel Seyfarth, Annette Danielsen, Bente Geil. All Danish designers that I love a lot!

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  80. Dear Katie, cannot wait for your newest book to arrive. And I love your invitation to tell you what to knit: I loved knitting the Fantoosh, it was such a simple but satisfying knit. Within no time, I had a lovely big wrap to snuggle up in that looked the part. A delightful yoga knitting!!! As much as love your stranded knitting patterns, I would love to see a design in one color on a 4.5 mm needle, in an easy to memorize pattern of purls and knits or lace. Enjoying your blog as always and with warm greetings from Ohio, Johanna.

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  81. I know that you want suggestions relating to new constructions, methods etc (and you are obviously getting some good ones) but, since you asked, please can I put in a plea for some patterns in smaller sizes suitable for grandchildren on another occasion?

    Love Edward Weston’s photos and Tom’s ‘inspired by’ ones. He is on a magic journey too.

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  82. Hello Kate, i à ma but fan of sweater of zadig et voltaire espacilly the modèle calling réglisse, it will be nice to create a pattern à little bit like that but with you i know the pattern will be morte feated and i appréciate that !

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  83. How about the Camel Leaf Cowl by Phreadde Davis. Perfect for our New England cold weather. I have made two. One with fewer repeats. And one on one size smaller needles. I wear them a lot!

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  84. A design of Helga Isager from DK. Take a look at her collections: “The Map Collection” and “Room 606”. The latest of hers “The Artisan” vil be translated to english in a couple og months. If you like two-tone brioche and sewing several knitted pieces together go for “Lone”.
    My best regards

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  85. I think aranmore yarn is well worth a try, I was astounded at the soft feel. I hope to make a sweater with it one day, and, I’m told it’s a very quick knit.

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  86. I am currently knitting and very much enjoying Marianne Isager’s “Winter” sweater using Isager Spinni yarn purchased from the Oxford Yarn Store. I recommend it as a slightly challenging knit with a beautifully fine tightly spun yarn.

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  87. How about one of the sock patterns from Clare Devine’s Blue Skies? She has some interesting heel constructions and as socks are quick and portable it wouldn’t conflict too much with your Bohus project when it turns up. I’d use one of the Blacker Yarns blends; I’m loving their Manx/Mohair 4ply (I’m freestyling some cable socks using it; it has a beautiful handle whilst feeling hard wearing). Wild Apples is a design that took my breath away the first time I saw it, I hope you find your kit soon!

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  88. Woodford by Elizabeth Doherty has a very interesting construction and different stitch patterns to create texture. It’s written for Brooklyn Tweed but my version in Skein Queen voluptuous skinny worked out really well. I think any 4-ply would work.

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  89. I’m a huge fan of Michelle Wang. Ella met up with her in New York….she designs a lot for Brooklyn Tweed using BT yarns but I’m sure there is no shortage of wonderful British yarns you could substitute. I think her designs are classic and timeless but fresh and very wearable. She does a video blog and can be fun to watch as well.

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    1. I second the motion for BT. I wonder what you will think knitting with Shelter or Loft. I was sold immediately after seeing a trunk show. It took me awhile to get used to the yarn but after blocking it is as light as a feather. What color is missing from your wardrobe? A cabled cardigan in Loft, in one of the dark greens, would be perfect for spring.

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  90. With your patterns in the Islay book, I am constantly being pulled by Jennifer Weissman ( Shadystroll) winter wear AND by Ambah and Melanie Berg patterns eg: Assana and Spice on the market.
    Clothes wise I love Gemstone by Veera Valimaki and any garment by Thea Colman /Coleman?
    There is so much knitting happiness out there to choose from.

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  91. I’ve been wanting to knit Recoleta by Joji Locatelli. I saw it knit up at my LYS and fell in love. The other one she had just knit was Bailey’s Irish Cream which has always been on my list. Neither of these offer any new techniques though. The Roadster Shawlette by Kate Jackson, looks like you :-) The Kindling Cowl pattern by Marie Greene is cute and new.
    That’s my list!

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  92. Whooah! Tables turned, most of my “to do” are your patterns but how about brioche? Any thing that sounds like cake can’t be all bad, a quick look on my ravelry suggests “Rispen” an interesting looking hat or could you make something using the rather wonderful looking “fox paws” pattern? I shall be checking out all the suggestions for inspiration, I’ve loved the wild apple since I saw it on your blog hope it turns up!

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    1. I agree with Eve’s suggestion to try brioche. I’ve only recently been tempted by brioche — scarves, etc. just felt sloppy and…odd. I’m currently working on Brioche Top Knot by Stephen West (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/brioche-top-knot) using Hedgehog Fibres merino: http://shop.hedgehogfibres.com/colours. The technique is fun, the colors are fun, it’s a hat so not a huge commitment in time or materials and the technique and materials are so very different from your designs and yarns it would be like a little knitting holiday. It took about 5 false starts until I got going, but it’s been fun!

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  93. I’m just starting a Weaverknits Neiman – an old Knitty design http://knitty.com/ISSUEfall07/PATTneiman.html – probably too simple for you, but I need something for the 5 skeins of uncommon Thread Lush Worsted (4 duck egg, one golden) that isn’t too challenging to take on the tube so I can knit on my way home. I love the idea of a yoke with an untraditional design and modern contrasting colours

    Liked by 1 person

  94. Have you looked at Hanna Falkenberg? Mostly garter stitch, interesting designs, variety of color choices, shetland yarn (not sure if this is “real” shetland, but it is lovely).

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  95. I have been making some gloves from the relatively new publication, Traditional Nordic Knits, by Johanna Wallin ( Trafalgar 2016—originally published in Swedish). Her thumb construction is new and interesting to me. If you haven’t seen this way of doing thumbs before, I am sure it would interest you. Congratulations on another finish and I hope you find the Bohus apples!

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  96. How about something in Cowichan Style? I just finished Tokul by andrea Rangel – quick with bulky yarn and very WARM! Probably very different from the patterns in Islay! All the best!

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  97. Tom’s photos take me to when my son and daughter were doing their art level, they always had to draw peppers for some reason. Good news about the banana, fruit flies aren’t that much fun. ;)
    I was wondering what to knit next myself last night and have decided on another Cochal in furze and haar but I don’t suppose that really helps you, sorry!!

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