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We are getting very excited here, as we are anticipating a large woolly delivery, and it will soon be time to announce the launch of our new yarn. I thought it was time to tell you a little more about it.

CoSsheep
(my favourite sheep, from Colours of Shetland)

I am a great advocate for using local materials, and nowhere more so than where wool is concerned. Sheep, and the human work around them, are an incredibly important part of the structure and character of the British landscape and I find it very sad that so many yarns made and sold in Britain in general, – and Scotland in particular – are not raised here, from our native sheep. With some notable exceptions, much of the wool described as “Scottish” has little or nothing at all to do with the many sheep raised in this landscape by hard-working farmers and crofters. So I wanted to create a yarn that was truly raised in Scotland – a yarn that was part of the work of this landscape – but I also wanted to make a yarn that defied long-standing assumptions about what Scottish wool was or could be. I am so tired of hearing that British and / or Scottish wool is coarse or scratchy. Scottish sheep produce wonderful, wearable fibres that, when properly sorted and graded, spin up into truly beautiful yarns. Over the years I have knit with many such yarns from small local wool producers. You might describe these yarns as lofty or springy or smooth or soft – you might describe them as interesting – but you would never describe them as coarse. I wanted my wool to reflect the characteristics of the interesting sheepy yarns I loved and admired. My yarn would be woolly and springy and durable – speaking of this land, and of the animals that grew it – but it would also be smooth and light and soft enough to wear next to the skin. These were my requirements, and, after many months of development and hard work, I am very happy to say, that this is what we’ve got in the finished product!

Selecting the finest fibres of some distinctive Scottish sheep breeds, we’ve created a completely unique yarn that you won’t find anywhere else. The yarn blends wool fibre that hails from as far north as you can travel in Scotland, and from as far south, too.

The yarn is called Buachaille. The first thing you are going to want to know is how to pronounce it.

(Thankyou, Anna)

Am Buchaille (the herdsman), is the Gaelic name associated with two mountains – Buachaille Etive Mòr, (great herdsman of Glen Etive), and Buachaille Etive Beag (little herdsman of Glen Etive). These mountains are well known to anyone who has followed the West Highland Way, or who likes Scottish mountain walking, and I’d go so far to say that Buachaille Etive Mor is among the most familiar and iconic of all Scottish munros.

highlandwazz
Me and both Buachailles in 2013

dearg12
Me knitting a sock on the summit of Buachaille Etive Mòr, in 2007!

These are mountains for which Tom and I hold an affection of long-standing. They are rugged and rocky and elemental . . . yet they are also breathtakingly elegant and sublime. They are somehow what one pictures when one conjures up the idea of a Scottish highland mountain. This – and their relative accessibility – explains why they are so frequently photographed. I think you’ll immediately be able to see the relationship between familiar images of Buachaille Etive Mòr, and Beag . . .

1364716995_b2fee6bff3_z

and the logo we designed for the yarn!

tagfront

Suggested by this one word – Buachaille – are a series of connections between humans, animals, and landscapes – all of the things, in other words, that we wanted the yarn to capture and express.

tagback

As you can see from the tag, Buachaille has been “raised in Scotland” and “made in Yorkshire.” As well as being grown by a host of Scottish sheep and farmers, and designed by us, Buachaille has involved lots of hard work from the best folk we know in the UK wool industry – these folk are in Yorkshire. Its important to me that the wool for Buachaille originated in Scotland, and its equally important that several skilled Yorkshire processors and manufacturers have been responsible for making it into yarn. As time goes on, I will tell you much more about the different processes involved in making Buachaille. . .

If you would like to be the first to know about our plans for the yarn, when it launches, and when you can get your hands on it, I have set up a newsletter. So if you’d like further information about Buachaille, please sign up here.

80 thoughts on “Buachaille – coming soon!

  1. If you would give us the phonetic pronunciation for Buachaille, it would help those of us “across the pond” a great deal, because we may not discern all of the subtleties of your Scottish sounds/pronunciation. Thanks!

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  2. Ooh! How exciting! I will very much look forward to your yarn coming out, I’m sure it will be as beautiful and successful as everything else you have done.

    BTW, the first time I signed up for the newsletter, I didn’t get the confirmation email, but the second time I filled in the form I changed the preferred format from HTML to Text and the email did come through. I don’t know what’s going on there, but hopefully I am signed up now. (Although really I would prefer HTML, ‘cos pictures! But never mind.)

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  3. Apologies if someone has already asked this, but I wondered if you may be introducing gift vouchers after the yarn? It would be such a lovely treat for knitters to be able to choose the yarn.

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  4. I got my first newsletter! How exciting… Lovely! Can wait for all the wonderful things that will come along with it. Cheers and all the best!

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  5. Kate, what an exciting year you are having. Hardly time to catch your breath. I did not see on the label sample what the stitch gauge will be? Please, don’t keep us waiting too long, at least give a few more details!!! Can’t wait!

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  6. Apparently it means “herdsman” or “cowherd” in Scots Gaelic while it’s just “boy” in Irish. I’m Irish so I will fondly think of it as Boy Wool! :-)

    Congratulations Kate, can’t wait to see it.

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  7. Hi – I have no knowledge of Facebook, I’m afraid, so don’t know why this happens. I do, however, have plenty more sound files which should help with pronunciation – and promise to post these later!

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  8. Very exciting new venture! I join the others in looking forward to the launch. I’m sure it will be in your usual impeccable way. I’m with Daria, the sound bite is too quick and just beyond my Americanized ear. Perhaps if Anna pronounced it slowly and then normally, it might help. The closest I can come is Bucca-eel.

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  9. One of my most satisfying yarn experiences with the offerings of Foula, when I made your teapot hat. There was a very elemental connectedness in seeing the remarkable landscape, enchanting sheep and magical tactile experience of the yarn itself. I look forward to this being a similar experience with perhaps a more refined hand. I also look forward to Canadian yarn stores trying to order in any manner that requires speaking the name – the resultant variants of the name should be hilarious. The name looks fantastic on the logo, but will be a challenge to those purchasing in a manner other than over the internet.
    Best of luck in this exciting endeavor.

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  10. Hello! Congratulations! I am so excited to hear about your new yarn line.

    I tried as well to sign up for the newsletter from a gmail account and haven’t received the confirmation. I have checked all folders and no sign. I am hoping you can add me in.

    Thank you!!

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  11. That’s so exciting I can’t wait to knit with it! Have you seen the cambrian mountains wool initiative? It’s some folk I know doing a similar thing here in Wales. Very exciting developments in provanence based wool 😊

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  12. Kate, how exciting! Your own yarn. Can you tell us if it will be in the natural shades of the sheeps wool? I can hardly wait to cast on with Buachaille!

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  13. Congratulations, dear Kate! What an exciting project to launch! This wool will surely be the labour of love, dedication and determination! Looking forward to it! And what a stylish, “clean”, minimal and meaningful logo!

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  14. I also tried to sign up for more news on your new wool, but did not get a confirming email. Looking forward to hearing more about it.

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    1. Hi Julienne,
      Do check your ‘promotions’ or ‘social’ folders if you have them set up – or check if the message has gone to spam? In the meantime, I have added your email address to the list manually.
      Hope that is ok!
      K

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  15. Crazy making!!! very exciting and noticed that work of it has ‘escaped’ to AU and was on Rebecca’s post on spindleandneedle.com. Hurrazh! Thank you again.

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  16. Och Kate, I’ve thought this is a direction you should go so I’m thrilled to see this announcement. As always a great deal of thought is evident. I can’t wait to see your yarn. Congratulations!

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  17. Congratulations! I wait with bated breath for the official launch of your home grown yarn. How timely your announcement coincided with a thought provoking post from Rebecca at Needle and Spindle on truly home grown/spun yarn and its environmental footprint.

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  18. Very excited! I tried to sign up for the email but have not received the confirm email. I see that somebody else has mentioned the same issue so thought I would just confirm it.

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  19. I have tried twice to sign up for the newsletter and have not received a confirmation e-mail. I am so excited to use this wool – maybe pj’s to keep me warm! Thanks Kate.

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  20. I understood from a fibershed lecture I went to 2 years ago that the coarseness of the yarn has something to do with what the sheep graze on. Do they need to use LGD dogs to guard the sheep? Or maybe you don’t have sheep predators in Scotland as we do in California?

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  21. What fabulous news. Here is one of the few things which blends my love of knitting with my husband’s love of climbing. Already, he is suggesting names of climbing routes on the Buachaille as lovely names for yarn colours. You’re having a blast of a year. Exciting.

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  22. What a fitting name. I have had the pleasure of hiking to the summit of Buachaille Evite Mor when we hiked the WHW last year. The mountain looks incredible from below, but to have had a view of the highlands from the summit was truly special. (But that last ‘scramble’ is terrifying)

    Put me down for a jumper’s worth :)

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  23. Oh Kate – you do everything with such style! And always so thoroughly researched. The logo alone is so tempting, I can’t wait to see (& feel) the wool. I feel sure it will be wonderful to knit with. Good luck to you in your new endeavour.

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  24. If you need any samples knitting, I would like to be first in the queue. Otherwise, I will wait patiently for the launch. I love your honesty and passion.

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  25. A very natural progression, given your commitment to your design aesthetic, Kate. Can’t wait to see the yarn! By the way, my first thought on the name was “hmn…I wonder why ‘boy’?” as the word for boy in Irish is “buachaill”. Interesting when our sister languages diverge slightly. Wishing you the very best of luck with the new venture!

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  26. I am of course fascinated by your endeavor Kate! I appreciate the well thought out name and design that has gone into your yarn. Looking forward to seeing the colors and yarn in person!

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  27. Good luck with your new venture, I always appreciate something that has a personal meaning. I’m familiar with this landscape and this is the mountain I always visualise when I follow Padraig O’Morain’s mountain mediation.

    (If anyone is interested in that resource, it was recommended by the teacher of a class I took on mindfulness and is available free. Just google Padraig mountain meditation.)

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  28. I’ve been checking your site several times for news on your wool. Congrats! It sounds so great and I can’t wait to read more about it!

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  29. Good for you!! I live in South Africa, where there is also wonderful wool to be had and I was rather dismayed recently to hear someone going on about the disadvantages of wool! So it may not just be Scottish wool that has a reputation for being scratchy etc. In any case, wool can use all the promotion it can get.

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  30. How delightful … and I am practically swooning over the thought of purchasing your fine yarn. I’m a not very experienced knitter way over here on a tiny island off the west coast of USA, but I am in love with Scotland. Looking forward to the clicking of my needles wiyh some 100% Scottish between them!

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  31. The new yarn sounds wonderful. Especially as it comes from Scottish sheep. Love the idea of it being processed in Yorkshire being a Yorkshire gal myself!

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  32. Congratulations!! I love that you make the connections between animals, landscapes and people! So true, I find the best yarns just have that. The name for your yarn and your design for the tags are simply perfect.I secretly hope, you will create kits with your yarns and patterns…Christmas is just around the corner ;0) Warm greetings from Ohio, Johanna

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  33. The yarn sounds beautiful! I spent my student days in Scotland (having visited family there every year of my life) and am from – and live in – Yorkshire, so it sounds like a particularly wonderful combination to me!

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  34. How exciting. As if your wedding and book are not enough this year! Curious as to what weights you will have…I’m putting in a request for fingering.Bill is requesting another vest. Looking forward to this new adventure.

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  35. Wonderful news Kate – I am so thrilled about this new adventure of yours. Very much looking forward to getting some of this exciting yarn with the beautiful name, Buachaille, onto my needles.
    Very best wishes to all.

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  36. Delighted to hear your dulcet tones Anna!

    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

    From:”Kate Davies Designs” Date:Sat, 22 Aug, 2015 at 12:50 Subject:[New post] Buachaille – coming soon!

    Kate posted: ” We are getting very excited here, as we are anticipating a large woolly delivery, and it will soon be time to announce the launch of our new yarn. I thought it was time to tell you a little more about it. (my favourite sheep, from Colours of Shet”

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  37. I am so excited about your new yarn venture, Kate! The story, the photos, the thought that has gone into it – it all sounds wonderful. I am hoping to be one of the lucky knitters who manages to buy some! I’m sure it’s going to sell out in a heartbeat.

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  38. Looking forward to it’so launch and also curious to hear why made in Yorkshire – roll on the next instalment of your yarn story.

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