Northmavine hoody

Phew! Things are really busy round here today! There is just time to show you the fourth design from Colours of Shetland – – the Northmavine Hoody.

Just like the accompanying hap, the hoody is inspired by the blues and greens of the rocks and water that shape the turbulent landscape of Northmavine.

The hoody uses exactly the same shades, in a subtly-shaded striped sequence.

The hap and the hoody don’t just share a colourway but a functional origin, which I discuss further in the book. . . .

This hoody is simple and classic in construction, and like many of the garments in Colours of Shetland, the pleasures of the design really are in the detail. It features inset pockets . . .

which are lined in a soft angora yarn, as well as turned facings which pick up the colours of the stripes and which are finished with . . .yes, you guessed it – i-cord.

As well as adding further pops of colour, the facings also have a purpose — to enable trouble-free zip insertion . . .

. . . fastening thus. . .

This is a garment designed for casual comfort and ease, to be worn as you will . . .

. . . whether you are out for a paddle . . .

Or enjoying a chilly walk on Ronas Hill

You can now find all relevant yarn, shade and yardage requirements over on the Northmavine Hoody pattern page.

a taste of Northmavine

Quite a few of you have been asking about the design depicted in my site’s new header. As there’s not long to go now till my book is published, I thought I’d give you a bit more of a taste of it.

This is the Northmavine Hap.

It uses one of the most familiar and easy-to-knit Shetland openwork patterns. This pattern is perhaps most often used to add a decorative border to plain accessories and garments, but I love its simple waves and bold stripes so much that I had to feature it all over the design!

Something about the all-over nature of the combination of shaded stripes with openwork makes this hap feel quite fresh and contemporary, I think.

The construction isn’t particularly traditional either, and I suppose neither is the distinctive centre shaping . . .

. . . which is meant to echo the smooth scalloped edges of Shetland’s beautiful and famous neolithic knives.

You may remember that, back in May, I was knitting a gigantic swatch, inspired by the colours of sea and stones. I played around with every green and blue and grey in the Jamieson and Smith palette before settling on the parrticular combination I used here.

I am really pleased with the end result — the hap neatly mixes a number of traditional and contemporary elements and speaks really well to the Northmavine ‘colour story’ it is designed to be a part of.

To read more of that story, you’ll have to wait for my Colours of Shetland book . . .

(not long now! We are almost there!)

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