bláithín

Bláithín is available for £3.95

Bláithín is an Irish name meaning “little flower”

This worsted-weight, soft Donegal cardigan features a colourwork yoke, inset pockets, i-cord edging, and a steeked front opening.

The design of this garment is simple, but some of the techniques involved in making it may be new to some knitters. The pattern includes instructions for all unfamiliar techniques, and additional support is also available on my website in a number of illustrated tutorials. Follow the links to 1) An introduction to Steeks 2) Crocheting and Reinforcement and 3) The Steek Sandwich. The pattern includes instructions for all unfamiliar techniques, and additional support is also available in a number of illustrated tutorials. Follow the links to 1) An introduction to Steeks 2) Crocheting and Reinforcement and 3) The Steek Sandwich.

For those who would like to modify the colourwork, the yoke is easily customised. It has been designed with short pattern repeats and decreases worked over plain rows. Insert your favourite motifs and make it your own!

Sizes
The pattern covers 9 sizes, from 30″ to 50″ bust

Yarn:
Donegal Yarns “Soft Donegal” Merino (100g / 207 yards). You will need between 770 and 1470 yards of the main colour (MC) Sample was worked in the following shades: 5228 (MC); 5207(CC1); 5236(CC2); 5230(CC3). See pattern for detailed yardage information.

Other materials

3 x 4.5mm (UK 7/US 7) circular needles, 80-100cm (30-40”) long. 1 x 4.5mm (UK 7/US 7) circular needle, 60cm (20”) long. Set of 5mm (UK 6/US 8) dpns for working i-cord. (Optional) set of 4.5mm (UK 7/US 7) dpns for working sleeves (or work using long circular needle & magic loop method). Waste yarn in contrasting colour for provisional c/o and holding sts. Strong sock yarn for working crocheted reinforcement. 3mm (UK 11/US C/2-D/3) crochet hook. Tapestry needle. Dressmaking pins. 7 x 25mm (1”) buttons.

Gauge
4.5 sts and 6 rows in 1 inch over stockinette in the round.







6 responses

  1. Dear Kate, at the age of 56 I had a stroke affecting the thalamus in December. Started knitting the next day; speech wasn’t affected but right arm and leg were paralysed for a remarkably short time. Can now stagger round the house without a stick so have been very lucky. I get tired very easily, a specific effect of thalamus damage as well as stroke damage. Arms tire too. Have knitted lots of baby things for new grandchild Robyn but have now returned to Fairisle cardi which I got wool for a while ago and didn’t get into. It is a Marie Wallin one and is done in felted tweed. I had already decided to do the body on a circular needle and after a few rows of rib converted to knitting in the round with a steek. I think I can accommodate the small steek less gap later, but am a bit worried as the yarn is 25% Alpaca! I haven’t steeked before and am concerned about its stick ability. Julie

leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s