some socks

I have been knitting some socks for about three months now, and finally finished them last night. It generally takes me a good long while to make a pair of socks. While I enjoy the process, for me, there is somehow no urgency about them. I do understand how some knitters find them completely addictive, but I am not among their ranks. For I am, at the moment at least, an outfit knitter. That is, in this year of making rather than buying clothes, I have become a shallow product-focused person who tends to knit things with specific outfits in mind. As said outfits rarely involve woolly socks, they are generally shoved to the bottom of the knitting pile. I’m also not commuting by train at the moment, so the sock knitting has definitely been suffering.

Anyway, here are the socks I made:

They are the Spring Forward pattern from the current Knitty that everyone seems to be making at the moment. I like the zigzags, and the lace, but it is the yarn that really swings these socks for me. It is from the wonderful Oxford Kitchen Yarns and came in a package of treats from Lara (thanks L!). The yarn is British Blueface Leicester. It is deliciously soft and slightly sheeny and there is something very distinctive about the way it takes colour. I love the natural dye on the yarn: both delicate and saturated. And the colour is really just lovely. To me it has a rather old-fashioned English feel: like the colour of old silks, or plum jam in rice pudding. I think the name of the colourway is actually light plum, and this seems just right to me. I also really like the way this very slightly semi-solid style of yarn shows off a textured pattern. Anyway,I now find myself very tempted by the lovely biscuity colours of some of the DK and Aran weights of Blueface Leicester dyed at Oxford Kitchen Yarns.

It is difficult to take pictures of socks whilst one is wearing them. But it was even harder for Tom to photograph my feet with the use of just one hand. I insisted he have a go anyway. He did a good job considering.

Patern: Linda Welch, “Spring Forward” Knitty, Spring Summer 2008
Needles: 2.5 mm circ (I am stuck in the magic loop)
Yarn: Oxford Kitchen Yarns, British Blueface Leicester sock yarn, “Light Plum”
Ravelled here

10 responses

  1. nice! I like that pattern more now that I see this version. I always get kind of cross-eyed looking at socks in busy multicolors and can see the stitch pattern so much better in a solid.

  2. They look lovely – I’m so glad you like the yarn. I have been thinking about plum jam while I’ve been making a pair of Having hope socks in it and I love how the yarn looks so edible and tasty. I am also a slow sock knitter even with my bus commute – I just find that with the socks progress is slow!

  3. Just back from a few days away and read about ‘the injury’ i hope all is well and Tom is now on the mend – My brother cut his hand -almost – off when he was just 6 also with broken glass -that was about 50 odd years ago and it was amazing what they could do even then – he became a drummer, guitarist and electrician – all needing full use of both hands so if they can do all that then I am sure Tom will make a full recovery.
    On to socks – my ma used to knit them for my dad all the time – I would visit and ask her what she was knitting –
    ‘nothing’
    what’s that on the pins then?
    oh they are just socks for your dad

    she didn’t even see them as knitting – just something she did automatically – he never wore a pair of shop bought socks until recently when she became ill – imagine – 60 years of handknitted socks and when she died I came across the wooden mushroom which she used to darn them – she would knit them from old sweaters that she unravelled and they were all pure wool and handwashed every time – now that’s dedication for you – and recycling when it was just ‘make do and mend’. Sorry – this has turned into a bit of an epic – love the socks!!

  4. wow, your mum was clearly a superlative sock knitter! I have my grandma’s darning mushroom – its an object I really like, both to look at and to handle. I love the way it is worn from so much use.

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